Wireless

iTit Wireless Breast Mouses

Breast Mouses

Breast Mouses

Breast Mouses . The iTit Optical Wireless Mouse is Technological Foreplay.Go ahead and file the iTit optical wireless mouse under the, “Are You Kidding Me?” category. It is a fully-functioning computer mouse, but it looks eerily similar to a human breast. With what appears to be a nipple that responds like a joystick, the iTit optical wireless mouse will not help the housebound geeks of the world. Better left at home then brought into the office, nothing says inappropriate quite like playing with your breast-shaped mouse.

Headphone Funky Lights To Complement Your Tunes

 Headphone Funky Lights To Complement Your Tunes

Headphone Funky Lights To Complement Your Tunes

Funky Lights To Complement Your Tunes. Tired of the same old opaque single tone band on your headphones, an OLED panel might just be the thing to spruce up boring monitors The Transparent OLED Headphones by designers Min-guk Ji & Hong-joo Kim & In-oh Yoo might be onto the coolest headphone invention yet. A headphone band is usually a piece of black or white plastic, but by using a transparent OLED panel for a headphone band, colors and patterns could be changed on a whim. They could show off a custom design, a dynamic pattern based on whatever track is rocking at the time, and they can scroll text too. The headphones are fully wireless too with touch controls along the sides for volume and lighting effects. Lights have been used to make laptops and mice shinier and “oh wow”, why not headphones too.

An injury has disrupted the current All-American Rejects tour.

All-American-RejectsAn injury has disrupted the current All-American Rejects tour, causing the band to miss one headlining date as well as a couple of shows with blink-182. Details are sketchy, but the band’s publicist issued a short e-mail today saying lead singer Ian Ritter “sustained an injury while on tour and is taking necessary precautions for a speedy recovery.”  Tyson Ritter of All American Rejects Video Game Awards, Sony Picture Studios, Culver City, Calif. December 14, 2008  The sudden change in Continue reading →

Google Voice is headed for Blackberry and Android handsets

iphone_googlevoiceGoogle Voice is headed for Blackberry and Android handsets, potentially turning smart phones into your hub for managing voice mail, all your contacts, and making low-cost phone calls, according to reports surfacing on the Web today.  The news, which by early this morning hadn’t yet officially been posted on Google’s own Voice blog, could be huge for mobile phone users who will be able to take advantage of all the cool features included in the Google Voice service. It also has the potential to irk wireless carriers by turning them into essentially “dumb pipe” providers, as Om Malik points out in a blog post. The Blackberry and Android applications were privately demonstrated yesterday by the creator of the original mobile application, which was originally called GrandCentral before being acquired in 2007 by Google, according to the GigaOM blog. The imminent release of the new applications was also reported on Google Voice’s Twitter page early this morning, promising that more details about the releases would come today. The Google Voice application for Blackberry and Android handsets will reportedly allow you to:

* Play voice mail messages from your Google Voice account

* Send and receive SMS messages, bypassing wireless carrier fees

* Read and store transcripts of voice mails

* Allow you to save money on long distance phone calls

Calls initiated from your cell phone using Google Voice are carried over your wireless carrier’s network and are not VoIP calls, according to reports. Late last month, Google began sending out a limited number of invitations for users to sign up and try Google Voice. You can still send in a request for the service.  So How Does it Work? The details of how Google’s Voice app will work on a mobile device are still unclear. Here is how I think it will likely work. First, let me outline how Google Voice works on the desktop.  To initiate a call using Google’s desktop Google Voice service, you have to visit your Google Voice account page and punch in a number you want to call. Next, your phone rings and then the second party’s phone rings and you’re both connected. The phone call is free and carried over a PSTN network connection (not over the Internet). With Google Voice’s mobile apps, all you do is launch the Google Voice app on your phone and use program’s keypad to dial the phone number you want and Google automatically connects the call from your handset to the call recipient. The call is seen as an inbound call to your phone by your wireless provider, so you still have to pay for airtime (depending on your contract) but you would not have to pay extra for a long distance wireless call. Check out what Verizon Wireless charges for long distance calls to get an idea on the potential savings.Google Become Your Personal Switchboard Operator These pending new developments certainly make Google a potentially bigger player in the wireless marketplace, on top of its inroads into search, operating systems, online office suites and more. Will we soon see an electric car from Google? When will we see a Google sponsorship decal on the next manned NASA space mission? Never say never. Yes, details are sketchy so far. But the implications are very interesting for users. This will have money and technology behind it, and if it works as planned, the big mobile phone carriers will likely want to ink some deals with Google so they can stay in the game. If Google shuts them out — wireless carriers may thwart Google’s mobile app aspirations. For consumers, a wireless turf war on the handset for functionality spells competition, innovation, and (fingers crossed) lower prices for services. This could be very cool.

The Low Anthem announce UK festival dates

the-low-anthemWith tickets selling fast for their two shows at the Slaughtered Lamb next month, and with a much bigger London date currently being scheduled for June, THE LOW ANTHEM have just announced news of numerous UK festival appearances this summer.  The Low Anthem will be performing at Glastonbury, Hard Rock Calling, Wireless, End Of The Road and Bestival, info below,

Wednesday 13 May – LONDON – The Slaughtered Lamb
Thursday 14 May – LONDON – The Slaughtered Lamb
Saturday 16 May – BRIGHTON – Horatios @ The Great Escape

Friday 26 June – GLASTONBURY – Glastonbury Festival (Q Stage)
Saturday 27 June – GLASTONBURY – Glastonbury Festival (Park Stage)
Sunday 28 June – LONDON – Hard Rock Calling

Saturday 4 July – LONDON – Wireless Festival

Friday 11 September – DORSET – End of the Road Festival
Saturday 12 September – DORSET – End of the Road Festival
Sunday 13 September – ISLE OF WIGHT – Bestival

THE LOW ANTHEM look set to be one of the success stories of 2009, Their sublime music ranges from evocative folk ballads sung in gorgeous falsettos to garage-roots rockers in a Tom Waits bar-room style, The Low Anthem are a folk rock trio from Providence, Rhode Island, United States. They formed in 2003 and consist of multi-instrumentalists Ben Miller, Jeff Prystowsky and Jocie Adams. The Low Anthem began as a contemporary folk duet from Providence, RI. Member’s Ben Miller and Jeff Prystowsky met playing in the wood-bat leagues of rural Connecticut in 2003. They began a collaboration with classical composer Jocie Adams in November 2007. Their landmark 2007 release “What the Crow Brings” was independently produced by the band and has received great acclaim from major press across the country. Their rapidly expanding fan-base spans all ages remarkably, as the duo appeals to hipsters, housewives and grandparents equally. Writers have typically drawn comparisons to Tom Waits, Neil Young, and Bob Dylan, but you will hear strains in their music from remote Appalachia to the Delta; an urban immediacy, and a timeless grounding in the great American roots music traditions. Rolling Stone says the music on Charlie Darwin feels “homemade” and “solemnly beautiful,” and NPR Music called the song “To Ohio” a “tender stunner” in choosing it as a Song of the Day, saying, “At times languid and haunting, but with detours into Tom Waits-esque stomping and hollering, The Low Anthem’s music seems equally informed by Simon & Garfunkel, Bob Dylan, The Band and a late-night ride home in Joni Mitchell’s car.” The band recently performed six sets at SXSW, where the BBC called them “stunning” and said, “Expect much flowerier words of praise thrown on this band in the future; they deserve everything said about them.” Mojo describe their set as “heartbreaking” and called the band, “truly startling songwriters and instrumentalists. Theirs is a gloriously romantic vision of America that sits somewhere between Dylan and Waits.” The New York Times wrote: “At the Central Presbyterian Church, the Low Anthem, from Providence, R.I., harmonized on slow, sustained songs — often waltzes — using instruments like harmonium, clarinet, some kind of small euphonium and a set of metal
discs played with a bow for eerie high tones, perfect accompaniment for lines like “Oh, my God, the water’s all around.” Most of the music was stately and mournful, with lyrics contemplating faith, loss, destruction and self-destruction in visionary imagery: “They say the sky’s the limit/The sky’s about to fall.” Every so often, making the quiet songs sound even quieter, the Low Anthem played something electric, bluesy and distorted, but equally serene in its desolation.” The Low Anthem, which recently signed to Nonesuch, has shared the stage with Rachael Yamagata, Lisa Hannigan, Ray Lamontagne and Elvis Perkins in Dearland. This summer they will re-release Oh My God Charlie Darwin with Nonesuch and Bella Union in Europe, and will play Bonnaroo, Glastonbury, and Hyde Park festival in London with Bruce Springsteen and the Dave Matthews Band.

http://www.myspace.com/lowanthem

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