Robert Downey Jr

Johnny Depp loves drinking with Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards

Johnny Depp

Johnny Depp

The 47-year-old star is thrilled to have developed a close friendship with the rocker ‘ who reprises his role as Captain Jack Sparrow’s father in ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End’ ‘ and loved hanging out with him on the set of the new swashbuckling adventure ‘ despite being unsure about his friend’s tipple of choice.

Johnny said: “He’s a fascinating man, you know. I’ve known him for a long time. To get periods on set where it’s just him and me hanging out, sitting around and yakking about music, movies whatever, was a real pleasure.

“I’m a wine man and I do like a good glass of red. So I would have my glass of wine and Keith would have his usual.

“I’ve no idea what it is, because it looks like nuclear waste and it’s a combination only he would know.”

Johnny – who has children Lily Rose, 11, and nine-year-old Jack with partner Vanessa Paradis ‘ says his son still loves to see him as his ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ character Jack Sparrow ‘ until his friend, ‘Iron Man’ star Robert Downey Jr., comes over.

He added in an interview with Radio Times magazine: “Oh yeah, he’s still into Captain Jack. But at the same tie he sees me every day, so he’s super used to Papa.

“And you know, Bob Downey, who is an old friend, comes over to the house for dinner and Jack’s like, ‘Oh my God!’ So then Captain Jack becomes secondary to Iron Man.”

HANDS-ON ACTING & FILM SCHOOL

HANDS-ON ACTING & FILM SCHOOL

HANDS-ON ACTING & FILM SCHOOL

HANDS-ON ACTING & FILM SCHOOL  The New York Film Academy’s School of Film and Acting is honored to be the school of choice of many luminaries in the film industry who have sent their family members to study with us. They include Steven Spielberg, Al Pacino, Robert Downey Jr., Jamie Foxx, Jodie Foster, Kevin Kline, Pierce Brosnan, Susan Sarandon and Tim Robbins, Bono(U2), directors Stephen Frears, Peter Bogdonavich, Roger Donaldson and James L. Brooks among others. The Film Academy was founded on the philosophy that “learning by doing” combined with best industry practices is more valuable than years of theoretical study for filmmakers and actors. This educational model allows students to achieve more in less time than at all other film or acting schools in the world.  NYFA offers an Accelerated Three-year Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) degree program in Filmmaking, as well as two-year Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degrees in Filmmaking, Acting for Film, Cinematography, Screenwriting, Producing and Photography, and two-year Associate of Fine Arts (AFA) degrees in Filmmaking and Acting for Film at our Los Angeles campus at Universal Studios. They are structured for students who want intensive training from award winning faculty using professional facilities and equipment starting their first day of classes; better preparing them for a career in the motion picture and entertainment industries. For those that are considering sharpening their skills, each of our film schools and acting schools offer short term filmmaking and acting workshops as well. We also host summer camps throughout the world that are designed for high school aged students. Are you ready for the most challenging and rewarding experience of your life? Gain unsurpassed real world experience to prepare you for a career in filmmaking, acting for film, screenwriting, producing, cinematography, 3D animation or musical theatre. You can enroll in a short-term workshop or spend one, two or three years dedicated to perfecting your craft, instead of just reading books and attending lectures. In a One-year Filmmaking Program at the New York Film Academy, you will write, shoot, direct and edit 8 projects and work on crew of 28 more! Register in any of our world-class programs and get the experience you need to excel in your field. NYFA is considered the best hands-on film school in the world by many of today’s top filmmakers.

Marvel Fires Edward Norton From “The Avengers”

Edward Norton

Edward Norton

Marvel Fires Edward Norton From “The Avengers”. Edward Norton has been fired from the upcoming Marvel Studios film “The Avengers,” in which he was tapped to reprise his role as Bruce Banner, a.k.a. The Hulk. The studio says it needs someone worthy, while Norton shoots back at the insult. The film will see some of Marvel superheroes come back, including Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow, and more. Norton, who played the green hero in 2008, was also asked to reprise his role, but it seems his services are not needed anymore. Marvel has fired the Oscar nominee from the film, insulting him in the process. President of Production Kevin Feige said, “Our decision is definitely not one based on monetary factors, but instead rooted in the need for an actor who embodies the creativity and collaborative spirit of our other talented cast members.” “‘The Avengers’ demands players who thrive working as part of an ensemble, as evidenced by Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Chris Evans, Sam  Jackson, Scarlett Johansson, and all of our talented casts. We are looking to announce a name actor who fulfills these requirements, and is passionate about the iconic role in the coming weeks.” Norton’s talent agent Brian Swardstrom shot back, saying after Feige offered the role to the actor, there had been “civil, uncontentious discussions” for weeks. Marvel has rescinded their offer even before they had signed a deal. He said, “This offensive statement from Kevin Feige at Marvel is a purposefully misleading, inappropriate attempt to paint our client in a negative light.” “We know a lot of fans have voiced their public disappointment with this result, but this is no excuse for Feige’s mean spirited, accusatory comments. Counter to what Kevin implies here, Edward was looking forward to the opportunity to work with Joss and the other actors in ‘The Avengers’ cast, many of whom are personal friends of his.” “Feige’s statement is unprofessional, disingenuous and clearly defamatory. Mr. Norton’s talent, tireless work ethic and professional integrity deserve more respect, and so do Marvel’s fans.” “The Avengers” is slated for a May 2012 release with Joss Whedon as director

Robert Downey Jr. on the LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN, CBS

Robert Downey Jr. on the LATE SHOW

Robert Downey Jr. on the LATE SHOW

Hailed by many critics as one of the most brilliant and versatile actors of his generation, Robert Downey Jr. chalked up a formidable onscreen track record that quickly launched the young thesp into the stratosphere. Although, for a time, Downey’s stormy offscreen life and personal problems threatened to challenge his public image, he quickly bounced back and overcame these setbacks, with a continued array of impressive roles on the big and small screens that never sacrificed his audience appeal or affability.   The son of underground filmmaker Robert Downey, Downey Jr. was born in New York City on April 4, 1965. He made his first onscreen appearance at the age of five, as a puppy in his father’s film Pound (1970). Between 1972 and 1990, he made cameo appearances in five more of his father’s films. The actor’s first significant role, in 1983′s Baby,_It’s_You, largely ended up on the cutting-room floor; it wasn’t until two years later that he began landing more substantial parts, first as a one-season cast member on Saturday_Night_Live and then in the comedy Weird_Science. In 1987, he landed plum roles in two films that capitalized on the Brat Pack phenomenon, James_Toback’s The Pick-Up Artist, (opposite Molly_Ringwald), and Less_Than_Zero, for which he won acclaim playing cocaine addict Julian Wells. Through it all, Downey cultivated an enviable instinct for role (and script) selection. His turns in Emile_Ardolino’s classy reincarnation fantasy Chances_Are (1989), Michael_Hoffman’s Soapdish (1992), Robert_Altman’s Short_Cuts (as the Iago-like Hollywood makeup artist Bill Bush), and Richard_Loncraine’s Richard III (1995) wowed viewers around the world, and often, on those rare occasions when Downey did choose substandard material (such as the lead in Richard_Attenborough’s deeply flawed Chaplin (1992), or an Australian media parasite in Oliver_Stone’s Natural_Born_Killers [1994]), his performance redeemed it. In fact, critics deemed Downey’s portrayal as one of the only worthwhile elements in the Chaplin biopic, and it earned the thesp a Best Actor Oscar nomination, as well as Golden Globe and British Academy Award noms. Around this time, Downey’s personal life took a turn for the worse. In June 1996, the LAPD arrested the actor (who had already spent time in three rehabilitation facilities between 1987 and 1996) on counts including drug use, driving under the influence, possession of a concealed weapon, and possession of illegal substances, a development which struck many as ironic, given his star-making performance years prior in Less than Zero. A month after this arrest, police found Downey Jr. unconscious on a neighbor’s lawn, under the influence of a controlled substance, and authorities again incarcerated him, taking him — this time — to a rehab center. A third arrest soon followed, as did another stint in rehab. His stay in rehab didn’t last long, as he walked out, thereby violating the conditions of his bail. More arrests and complications followed — in fact, the actor had to be released from rehab to make James_Toback’s Two Girls and a Guy — but he still landed a few screen appearances and won praise for his work in Mike_Figgis’ One_Night_Stand (1997) and Altman’s otherwise-disappointing Gingerbread_Man (1998). In addition, he starred in one of his father’s films, the offbeat Hugo_Pool (1997). In 1999, he had three films out in theaters: Friends and Lovers, Bowfinger, and In_Dreams. He delivered a particularly chilling performance in the latter, as longhaired psychopathic child murderer Vivian Thompson, that arguably ranked with his finest work. But Downey’s problems caught up with him again that same year, when he was re-arrested and sentenced to 12 months in a state penitentiary. These complications led to the actor’s removal from the cast of the summer 2001 Julia Roberts/Billy Crystal comedy America’s Sweethearts and his removal from a stage production of longtime friend Mel Gibson’s +Hamlet, although a memorably manic performance in Curtis Hanson’s Wonder Boys made it to the screen in 2000. Downey’s decision — after release — to pursue television work, with a recurring role on Ally McBeal, marked a brief comeback (he won a 2001 Best TV Series Supporting Actor Golden Globe for the performance). Nevertheless, series creator David E. Kelley and the show’s other producers sacked Downey permanently when two additional arrests followed. During this period, Downey also allegedly dated series star Calista Flockhart. In 2002, a Riverside, CA, judge dismissed all counts against Downey. In time, the former addict counseled other celebrity addicts and became something of a spokesperson for rehabilitation. He starred as a hallucination-prone novelist in The Singing Detective in 2003, and while the film didn’t achieve mainstream success, critics praised Downey for his interpretation of the role, alongside Oscar winners Adrien Brody and Mel Gibson. The same could be said for Gothika (2003), the psychological thriller that placed him opposite Hollywood heavyweight Halle Berry. In 2004, Downey appeared in Steven Soderbergh’s portion of the film Eros.   Downey achieved success throughout 2005 with appearances in George Clooney’s critically lauded Good Night, and Good Luck — as one of Ed Murrow’s underlings — and he paired up with Val Kilmer in Shane Black’s directorial debut Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang. He continued balancing more mainstream fare, such as Disney’s Shaggy Dog remake, with challenging films such as Richard Linklater’s rotoscoped adaptation A Scanner Darkly. That same year, Downey wrapped production on Hanson’s Lucky You, the story of a card shark (Eric Bana) who faces off against his father (Robert Duvall) at the legendary World Series of Poker, while simultaneously attempting to woo a beautiful singer (Drew Barrymore). Downey continued to show his versatility by joining the casts of Zodiac, David Fincher’s highly-touted film about the Zodiac Killer, and the Diane Arbus biopic Fur, with Nicole Kidman. A supporting role in Jon Poll’s 2007 directorial debut Charlie Bartlett followed. The biggest was yet to come, however, as 2007 found Downey taking on the roles that would make him an even bigger star than he’d been in his youth, as he took on the leading role of sarcastic billionaire and part-time super hero Tony Stark in the big screen adaptation of the comic book Iron Man, as well as self-important actor Kirk Lazarus in the comedy Tropic Thunder. Both films turned out to be not just blockbuster successes at the box office, but breakaway hits with critics as well, and in addition to major praise, the actor also walked away from 2008 with an Oscar nomination for his performance in Tropic Thunder.  Wed to actress Deborah Falconer from 1992-2004, Downey married Gothika producer Susan Levin in 2005. He and Falconer have one son, Indigo Downey. Watch Robert tonight on the Late Show.  We 4/28: Robert Downey Jr., OK Go

Charlize Theron, Robert Downey Jr. Among New Oscars Presenters Announced

Charlize Theron, Robert Downey Jr. Among New Oscars Presenters Announced

Charlize Theron, Robert Downey Jr. Among New Oscars Presenters Announced

Charlize Theron and Robert Downey Jr. are a couple more stars you can expect to see at the Academy Awards this Sunday. According to People.com, the team behind the ceremony announced Theron, Downey Jr., and a slew of other stars who’ll be presenting Oscars to the winners yesterday.  Theron at the Oscars in 2000 (Bauer Griffin)
Theron scored a Best Actress prize in 2003 for her turn as a killer in Monster, and she’s a constant fixture on the red carpet (we can’t wait to see her gown!) As for Downey, he was nominated in the Best Supporting Actor category last year for Tropic Thunder but lost out to the late Heath Ledger. And even though he didn’t score a nod this time around for Sherlock Holmes, he did win a Golden Globe award for that performance. In addition to these two, Oscar winners Barbra Streisand and Kathy Bates will be joining the bunch. People.com reports that Queen Latifah, Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta are on the roster as well.    Sounds like a lively bunch! Teen favorites like Kristen Stewart and Taylor Lautner are also attending this year, in addition to comedians Steve Carell and Tina Fey, so we can definitely expect some laughs.


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‘Avatar’ wins two Golden Globes

James Cameron carried home two Golden Globes on Sunday night for his 3-D blockbuster, “Avatar.”  “Avatar,” which has sold $1.6 billion in tickets worldwide in just a month, was chosen best movie drama, while Cameron won for best movie director. “We have the best job in the world,” Cameron said.   Many of the winners and presenters at the 67th Golden Globes wore red and yellow ribbons, a reminder of Tuesday’s devastating earthquake in Haiti. “It does feel strange to dress up and play fantasy, but I’m glad we are talking about it,” actress Kyra Sedgwick told our source  on the red carpet.  Globe producers included several appeals in the awards broadcast for viewers to donate to Haitian relief efforts.  As “Crazy Heart” star Jeff Bridges accepted the best actor in a movie drama award — the first Golden Globe of his career — he joked about his lack of awards.  “Wow, you’re really screwing up my under-appreciated status here,” Bridges said.  The best actress in a movie drama went to Sandra Bullock for her work in “The Blind Side.” Robert Downey Jr. won the Globe for best actor in a movie comedy or musical for his role in “Sherlock Holmes.”  Downey joked that he didn’t have an acceptance speech because his wife told him Matt Damon would win the category for “The Informant!”  “The Hangover,” a comedy about misadventures in Las Vegas, won the Golden Globe for best comedy or musical movie.  Former boxing champ Mike Tyson, who played himself in the film, stood onstage as a movie director Todd Phillips accepted the award.  Austrian actor Christoph Waltz won the Golden Globe for best supporting actor in a movie for “Inglourious Basterds.”  The role of Nazi Colonel Hans Landa — the villain in Quentin Tarantino’s film — required Waltz to speak four languages fluently.  The Golden Globe for best TV drama was awarded to AMC’s “Mad Men” for the third straight year.  Alec Baldwin repeated his Emmy success at the Globes, winning the best actor in a TV comedy or musical series award.   Meryl Streep took home her seventh Golden Globe, one for best actress in a comedy or musical movie, for “Julie & Julia.”  Streep, referring to last week’s earthquake in Haiti, said it was hard for her to put on her “happy movie self, in face of everything I am aware of in the real world.”  Streep had two chances to win the category, because she was also nominated for “It’s Complicated.”  Kevin Bacon won the Golden Globe for best actor in a made-for-TV miniseries or movie for his acting in HBO’s “Taking Chance.” It was his first Globe.  The Globe for best actress in a made-for-TV miniseries or movie went to Drew Barrymore for HBO’s “Gray Gardens.” It was her first Globe win after three nominations. Chloe Sevigny, who plays the second wife in HBO’s “Big Love,” took the best supporting actress Globe for a made-for-TV miniseries or movie.  “Up in the Air,” which was up for Globes in six categories, won the best screenplay award. Showtime’s “Dexter” grabbed Golden Globes for best actor — Michael C. Hall — and best supporting actor — John Lithgow — in a TV series, miniseries or movie.  The best actress in a TV drama series went to Julianna Margulies for her work in “The Good Wife” on CBS.   Comedian Mo’Nique won the Golden Globe for best supporting actress in a movie for her role as an abusive mother in “Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire.”  “I’m shaking when I tell y’all I’m in the midst of my dream,” Mo’Nique said.  Toni Collette won the best actress in a TV comedy or musical TV series for Showtime’s “United States of Tara.” It was Collette’s first Globe win, though she has been nominated four times.  The Disney-Pixar blockbuster “Up” won the Golden Globe for best animated movie. Pixar has won the category every year since it was started four years ago.  “Up” was also honored for best original movie score, which was composed by Michael Giacchino.  The award for best original song for a movie went to T Bone Burnett’s “The Weary Kind,” the theme for “Crazy Heart.”  The Golden Globe for best foreign language film was given to Germany’s “The White Ribbon.” Film legend Sophia Loren presented the award.  On the red carpet, the earthquake in Haiti and rain over Los Angeles dampened the Golden Globes Sunday evening.  Dresses were as glamorous as ever, but the talk was less about the competition and more about the relief efforts under way in Haiti. “It does feel strange to dress up and play fantasy, but I’m glad we are talking about it,” said Kyra Sedgwick, nominated for a fifth time as best actress in a TV drama for “The Closer.”  British comic Ricky Gervais, who is hosting the 67th Golden Globes show, said “someone much more important than me” will address the Haiti tragedy during the NBC telecast.   Actress Olivia Wilde, who was already involved in supporting an orphanage and three schools in Haiti, said her Golden Globe dress and several others will be auctioned off with “100 percent of the money going to a local program in Haiti.”  “It’s my way of turning all this fashion madness into something positive,” Wilde said.  George Clooney, up for a best actor award for his film “Up in the Air,” will host a telethon on Friday to raise money for the devastated island nation. “Up in the Air” has six Golden Globe nominated, the most of any other movie.  The Golden Globes, produced by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, is the opening act in the 2010 awards season.  Umbrellas were out as a rare rain fell Sunday evening. The first section of the red carpet leading into the Beverly Hilton Hotel was not covered.

Sandra Bullock Named Top Money-Making Star Of 2009

 ”Miss Congeniality” Sandra Bullock is the Top Money-Making Star of 2009, according to Quigley Publishing Company’s 78th Annual Poll of Exhibitors. The 45-year-old Golden Globe-nominated actress appeared in three films this past year: “The Blind Side,” “The Proposal,” and “All About Steve.”  The Quigley Poll is an annual survey of motion picture theater owners and film buyers, which asks them to vote for the ten stars they think generated the most revenue for their theaters. Bullock is the eighth woman to top the survey, some of whom were voted multiple times. The women voted as Top Money Makers in the poll’s 78-year history were: Marie Dressler (1932, 1933), Shirley Temple (1935,1936, 1937, 1938), Betty Grable (1943), Elizabeth Taylor (1961), Doris Day (1960,1962, 1963, 1954), Julie Andrews (1966, 1967), and Julia Roberts (1999).  Johnny Depp, who was at first place in 2006 and 2007, is at second place with his films “Public Enemies” and “The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus,” while “Invictus” and “The Informant!” star Matt Damon is at third. Another female money-maker who made the top 10 is the iconic Meryl Streep, who places at seventh with “Julie and Julia,” “It’s Complicated,” and “Fantastic Mr. Fox.”  Also in the list are Brad Pitt, Tom Hanks, and Robert Downey Jr.  The Exhibitors were also asked to name one actor and one actress they think will be included in the list in the years to come. Carey Mulligan, who starred in “An Education,” “Brothers,” and “Public Enemies,” and “New Moon” star Taylor Lautner are named the Stars of Tomorrow for 2009.

Top Ten Money-Making Stars of 2009:

1.Sandra Bullock
2.Johnny Depp
3.Matt Damon
4.George Clooney
5.Robert Downey Jr.
6.Tom Hanks
7.Meryl Streep
8.Brad Pitt
9.Shia LaBeouf
10.Denzel Washington

Scarlett Johansson refused to show hubby her black catsuit

1158_scarlett-johansson-louis-vuittScarlett Johansson wants to surprise husband Ryan Reynolds with her ‘tight’ ‘Iron Man 2’ outfit.  The Hollywood actress – who portrays Natasha Romanoff and her sexy alter-ego, Russian spy Black Widow, in the new superhero movie – has refused to show off her black catsuit to her actor spouse because she wants to gauge his reaction when sees her on the big screen. She said: “I have been so secretive about the suit that I have actually not Continue reading →

Nominees & Winners for the 81st Academy Awards

81st_annual_oscars_posterPerformance by an actor in a leading role

  • Richard Jenkins in “The Visitor” (Overture Films)
  • Frank Langella in “Frost/Nixon” (Universal)

star1Sean Penn in “Milk” (Focus Features)

  • Brad Pitt in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)
  • Mickey Rourke in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

  • Josh Brolin in “Milk” (Focus Features)
  • Robert Downey Jr. in “Tropic Thunder” (DreamWorks, Distributed by DreamWorks/Paramount)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman in “Doubt” (Miramax)

star1Heath Ledger in “The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.)

  • Michael Shannon in “Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage)

Performance by an actress in a leading role

  • Anne Hathaway in “Rachel Getting Married” (Sony Pictures Classics)
  • Angelina Jolie in “Changeling” (Universal)
  • Melissa Leo in “Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics)
  • Meryl Streep in “Doubt” (Miramax)

star1Kate Winslet in “The Reader” (The Weinstein Company)

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

  • Amy Adams in “Doubt” (Miramax)

star1Penélope Cruz in “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (The Weinstein Company)

  • Viola Davis in “Doubt” (Miramax)
  • Taraji P. Henson in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)
  • Marisa Tomei in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Best animated feature film of the year

  • Bolt” (Walt Disney), Chris Williams and Byron Howard
  • Kung Fu Panda” (DreamWorks Animation, Distributed by Paramount), John Stevenson and Mark Osborne

star1WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Andrew Stanton

Achievement in art direction

  • Changeling” (Universal), Art Direction: James J. Murakami, Set Decoration: Gary Fettis

star1The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Donald Graham Burt, Set Decoration: Victor J. Zolfo

  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Nathan Crowley, Set Decoration: Peter Lando
  • The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Art Direction: Michael Carlin, Set Decoration: Rebecca Alleway
  • Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Art Direction: Kristi Zea, Set Decoration: Debra Schutt

Achievement in cinematography

  • Changeling” (Universal), Tom Stern
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Claudio Miranda
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Wally Pfister
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Chris Menges and Roger Deakins

star1Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Anthony Dod Mantle

Achievement in costume design

  • Australia” (20th Century Fox), Catherine Martin
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Jacqueline West

star1The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Michael O’Connor

  • Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Glicker
  • Revolutionary Road”  (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Albert Wolsky

Achievement in directing

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Fincher
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Ron Howard
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Gus Van Sant
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Stephen Daldry

star1Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Danny Boyle

Best documentary feature

  • The Betrayal (Nerakhoon)” (Cinema Guild), A Pandinlao Films Production, Ellen Kuras and Thavisouk Phrasavath
  • Encounters at the End of the World” (THINKFilm and Image Entertainment), A Creative Differences Production, Werner Herzog and Henry Kaiser
  • The Garden” A Black Valley Films Production, Scott Hamilton Kennedy

star1Man on Wire” (Magnolia Pictures), A Wall to Wall in association with Red Box Films Production, James Marsh and Simon Chinn

  • Trouble the Water” (Zeitgeist Films), An Elsewhere Films Production, Tia Lessin and Carl Deal

Best documentary short subject

  • The Conscience of Nhem En” A Farallon Films Production, Steven Okazaki
  • The Final Inch” Vermilion Films in association with Google.org, Irene Taylor Brodsky and Tom Grant

star1Smile Pinki” A Principe Production, Megan Mylan

  • The Witness – From the Balcony of Room 306” A Rock Paper Scissors Production, Adam Pertofsky and Margaret Hyde

Achievement in film editing

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lee Smith
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Mike Hill and Dan Hanley
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Elliot Graham

star1Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Chris Dickens

Best foreign language film of the year

  • The Baader Meinhof Complex” A Constantin Film Production, Germany
  • The Class” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Haut et Court Production, France

star1Departures” (Regent Releasing), A Departures Film Partners Production, Japan

  • Revanche” (Janus Films), A Prisma Film/Fernseh Production, Austria
  • Waltz with Bashir” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Bridgit Folman Film Gang Production, Israel

Achievement in makeup

star1The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Greg Cannom

  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), John Caglione, Jr. and Conor O’Sullivan
  • Hellboy II: The Golden Army” (Universal), Mike Elizalde and Thom Floutz

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Alexandre Desplat
  • Defiance” (Paramount Vantage), James Newton Howard
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Elfman

star1Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A.R. Rahman

  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Thomas Newman

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)

  • Down to Earth” from “WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Music by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman, Lyric by Peter Gabriel

star1Jai Ho” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music by A.R. Rahman, Lyric by Gulzar

  • O Saya” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music and Lyric by A.R. Rahman and Maya Arulpragasam

Best motion picture of the year

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), A Kennedy/Marshall Production, Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall and Ceán Chaffin, Producers
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), A Universal Pictures, Imagine Entertainment and Working Title Production, Brian Grazer, Ron Howard and Eric Fellner, Producers
  • Milk” (Focus Features), A Groundswell and Jinks/Cohen Company Production, Dan Jinks and Bruce Cohen, Producers
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), A Mirage Enterprises and Neunte Babelsberg Film GmbH Production, Anthony Minghella, Sydney Pollack, Donna Gigliotti and Redmond Morris, Producers

star1Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A Celador Films Production, Christian Colson, Producer

Best animated short film

star1La Maison en Petits Cubes” A Robot Communications Production, Kunio Kato

  • Lavatory – Lovestory” A Melnitsa Animation Studio and CTB Film Company Production, Konstantin Bronzit
  • Oktapodi” (Talantis Films), A Gobelins, L’école de l’image Production, Emud Mokhberi and Thierry Marchand
  • Presto” (Walt Disney), A Pixar Animation Studios Production, Doug Sweetland
  • This Way Up” A Nexus Production, Alan Smith and Adam Foulkes

Best live action short film

  • Auf der Strecke (On the Line)” (Hamburg Shortfilmagency), An Academy of Media Arts Cologne Production, Reto Caffi
  • Manon on the Asphalt” (La Luna Productions), A La Luna Production, Elizabeth Marre and Olivier Pont
  • New Boy” (Network Ireland Television), A Zanzibar Films Production, Steph Green and Tamara Anghie
  • The Pig” An M & M Production, Tivi Magnusson and Dorte Høgh

star1Spielzeugland (Toyland)” A Mephisto Film Production, Jochen Alexander Freydank

Achievement in sound editing

star1The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Richard King

  • Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), Frank Eulner and Christopher Boyes
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Glenn Freemantle and Tom Sayers
  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Ben Burtt and Matthew Wood
  • Wanted” (Universal), Wylie Stateman

Achievement in sound mixing

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Parker, Michael Semanick, Ren Klyce and Mark Weingarten
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lora Hirschberg, Gary Rizzo and Ed Novick

star1Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Ian Tapp, Richard Pryke and Resul Pookutty

  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Tom Myers, Michael Semanick and Ben Burtt
  • Wanted” (Universal), Chris Jenkins, Frank A. Montaño and Petr Forejt

Achievement in visual effects

star1The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Eric Barba, Steve Preeg, Burt Dalton and Craig Barron

  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Nick Davis, Chris Corbould, Tim Webber and Paul Franklin
  • Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), John Nelson, Ben Snow, Dan Sudick and Shane Mahan

Adapted screenplay

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Screenplay by Eric Roth, Screen story by Eric Roth and Robin Swicord
  • Doubt” (Miramax), Written by John Patrick Shanley
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Screenplay by Peter Morgan
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Screenplay by David Hare

starSlumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Screenplay by Simon Beaufoy

Original screenplay

  • Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics), Written by Courtney Hunt
  • Happy-Go-Lucky” (Miramax), Written by Mike Leigh
  • In Bruges” (Focus Features), Written by Martin McDonagh

star1Milk” (Focus Features), Written by Dustin Lance Black

  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Screenplay by Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon, Original story by Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter

Oscar: Nominees for the 81st Academy Awards

oscarsPerformance by an actor in a leading role

  • Richard Jenkins in “The Visitor” (Overture Films)
  • Frank Langella in “Frost/Nixon” (Universal)
  • Sean Penn in “Milk” (Focus Features)
  • Brad Pitt in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)
  • Mickey Rourke in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

  • Josh Brolin in “Milk” (Focus Features)
  • Robert Downey Jr. in “Tropic Thunder” (DreamWorks, Distributed by DreamWorks/Paramount)
  • Philip Seymour Hoffman in “Doubt” (Miramax)
  • Heath Ledger in “The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.)
  • Michael Shannon in “Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage)

Performance by an actress in a leading role

  • Anne Hathaway in “Rachel Getting Married” (Sony Pictures Classics)
  • Angelina Jolie in “Changeling” (Universal)
  • Melissa Leo in “Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics)
  • Meryl Streep in “Doubt” (Miramax)
  • Kate Winslet in “The Reader” (The Weinstein Company)

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

  • Amy Adams in “Doubt” (Miramax)
  • Penélope Cruz in “Vicky Cristina Barcelona” (The Weinstein Company)
  • Viola Davis in “Doubt” (Miramax)
  • Taraji P. Henson in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.)
  • Marisa Tomei in “The Wrestler” (Fox Searchlight)

Best animated feature film of the year

  • Bolt” (Walt Disney), Chris Williams and Byron Howard
  • Kung Fu Panda” (DreamWorks Animation, Distributed by Paramount), John Stevenson and Mark Osborne
  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Andrew Stanton

Achievement in art direction

  • Changeling” (Universal), Art Direction: James J. Murakami, Set Decoration: Gary Fettis
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Donald Graham Burt, Set Decoration: Victor J. Zolfo
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Art Direction: Nathan Crowley, Set Decoration: Peter Lando
  • The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Art Direction: Michael Carlin, Set Decoration: Rebecca Alleway
  • Revolutionary Road” (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Art Direction: Kristi Zea, Set Decoration: Debra Schutt

Achievement in cinematography

  • Changeling” (Universal), Tom Stern
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Claudio Miranda
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Wally Pfister
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Chris Menges and Roger Deakins
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Anthony Dod Mantle

Achievement in costume design

  • Australia” (20th Century Fox), Catherine Martin
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Jacqueline West
  • The Duchess” (Paramount Vantage, Pathé and BBC Films), Michael O’Connor
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Glicker
  • Revolutionary Road”  (DreamWorks, Distributed by Paramount Vantage), Albert Wolsky

Achievement in directing

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Fincher
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Ron Howard
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Gus Van Sant
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Stephen Daldry
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Danny Boyle

Best documentary feature

  • The Betrayal (Nerakhoon)” (Cinema Guild), A Pandinlao Films Production, Ellen Kuras and Thavisouk Phrasavath
  • Encounters at the End of the World” (THINKFilm and Image Entertainment), A Creative Differences Production, Werner Herzog and Henry Kaiser
  • The Garden” A Black Valley Films Production, Scott Hamilton Kennedy
  • Man on Wire” (Magnolia Pictures), A Wall to Wall in association with Red Box Films Production, James Marsh and Simon Chinn
  • Trouble the Water” (Zeitgeist Films), An Elsewhere Films Production, Tia Lessin and Carl Deal

Best documentary short subject

  • The Conscience of Nhem En” A Farallon Films Production, Steven Okazaki
  • The Final Inch” Vermilion Films in association with Google.org, Irene Taylor Brodsky and Tom Grant
  • Smile Pinki” A Principe Production, Megan Mylan
  • The Witness – From the Balcony of Room 306” A Rock Paper Scissors Production, Adam Pertofsky and Margaret Hyde

Achievement in film editing

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Kirk Baxter and Angus Wall
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lee Smith
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Mike Hill and Dan Hanley
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Elliot Graham
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Chris Dickens

Best foreign language film of the year

  • The Baader Meinhof Complex” A Constantin Film Production, Germany
  • The Class” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Haut et Court Production, France
  • Departures” (Regent Releasing), A Departures Film Partners Production, Japan
  • Revanche” (Janus Films), A Prisma Film/Fernseh Production, Austria
  • Waltz with Bashir” (Sony Pictures Classics), A Bridgit Folman Film Gang Production, Israel

Achievement in makeup

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Greg Cannom
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), John Caglione, Jr. and Conor O’Sullivan
  • Hellboy II: The Golden Army” (Universal), Mike Elizalde and Thom Floutz

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Alexandre Desplat
  • Defiance” (Paramount Vantage), James Newton Howard
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Danny Elfman
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A.R. Rahman
  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Thomas Newman

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)

  • Down to Earth” from “WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Music by Peter Gabriel and Thomas Newman, Lyric by Peter Gabriel
  • Jai Ho” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music by A.R. Rahman, Lyric by Gulzar
  • O Saya” from “Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Music and Lyric by A.R. Rahman and Maya Arulpragasam

Best motion picture of the year

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), A Kennedy/Marshall Production, Kathleen Kennedy, Frank Marshall and Ceán Chaffin, Producers
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), A Universal Pictures, Imagine Entertainment and Working Title Production, Brian Grazer, Ron Howard and Eric Fellner, Producers
  • Milk” (Focus Features), A Groundswell and Jinks/Cohen Company Production, Dan Jinks and Bruce Cohen, Producers
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), A Mirage Enterprises and Neunte Babelsberg Film GmbH Production, Anthony Minghella, Sydney Pollack, Donna Gigliotti and Redmond Morris, Producers
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), A Celador Films Production, Christian Colson, Producer

Best animated short film

  • La Maison en Petits Cubes” A Robot Communications Production, Kunio Kato
  • Lavatory – Lovestory” A Melnitsa Animation Studio and CTB Film Company Production, Konstantin Bronzit
  • Oktapodi” (Talantis Films), A Gobelins, L’école de l’image Production, Emud Mokhberi and Thierry Marchand
  • Presto” (Walt Disney), A Pixar Animation Studios Production, Doug Sweetland
  • This Way Up” A Nexus Production, Alan Smith and Adam Foulkes

Best live action short film

  • Auf der Strecke (On the Line)” (Hamburg Shortfilmagency), An Academy of Media Arts Cologne Production, Reto Caffi
  • Manon on the Asphalt” (La Luna Productions), A La Luna Production, Elizabeth Marre and Olivier Pont
  • New Boy” (Network Ireland Television), A Zanzibar Films Production, Steph Green and Tamara Anghie
  • The Pig” An M & M Production, Tivi Magnusson and Dorte Høgh
  • Spielzeugland (Toyland)” A Mephisto Film Production, Jochen Alexander Freydank

Achievement in sound editing

  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Richard King
  • Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), Frank Eulner and Christopher Boyes
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Glenn Freemantle and Tom Sayers
  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Ben Burtt and Matthew Wood
  • Wanted” (Universal), Wylie Stateman

Achievement in sound mixing

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), David Parker, Michael Semanick, Ren Klyce and Mark Weingarten
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Lora Hirschberg, Gary Rizzo and Ed Novick
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Ian Tapp, Richard Pryke and Resul Pookutty
  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Tom Myers, Michael Semanick and Ben Burtt
  • Wanted” (Universal), Chris Jenkins, Frank A. Montaño and Petr Forejt

Achievement in visual effects

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Eric Barba, Steve Preeg, Burt Dalton and Craig Barron
  • The Dark Knight” (Warner Bros.), Nick Davis, Chris Corbould, Tim Webber and Paul Franklin
  • Iron Man” (Paramount and Marvel Entertainment), John Nelson, Ben Snow, Dan Sudick and Shane Mahan

Adapted screenplay

  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” (Paramount and Warner Bros.), Screenplay by Eric Roth, Screen story by Eric Roth and Robin Swicord
  • Doubt” (Miramax), Written by John Patrick Shanley
  • Frost/Nixon” (Universal), Screenplay by Peter Morgan
  • The Reader” (The Weinstein Company), Screenplay by David Hare
  • Slumdog Millionaire” (Fox Searchlight), Screenplay by Simon Beaufoy

Original screenplay

  • Frozen River” (Sony Pictures Classics), Written by Courtney Hunt
  • Happy-Go-Lucky” (Miramax), Written by Mike Leigh
  • In Bruges” (Focus Features), Written by Martin McDonagh
  • Milk” (Focus Features), Written by Dustin Lance Black
  • WALL-E” (Walt Disney), Screenplay by Andrew Stanton, Jim Reardon, Original story by Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter
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