mojo

The MOJO Honours List will announced with Kasabian

kasabianThe MOJO Honours List will announce the 2009 nominations alongside an incredible series of free performances on Wednesday 6 May at HMV’s flagship store on Oxford Street. Confirmed to perform are Leicester’s Kasabian, the legendary and influential The Pretty Things, New York’s School Of Seven Bells and Lightning Seeds leader Ian Broudie.      The winners of The 2009 MOJO Honours List will be announced on Thursday 11 June at The Brewery, London. Legends of music, unsung heroes and contemporary talent will join together in celebration of the MOJO year in music and the 2009 winners.  The MOJO Honours List nominations launch is a celebration of music that takes place over two sessions at lunchtime and evening, both with free entry to the public. Taking to the HMV, Oxford Street stage at 12:30pm will be Ian Broudie (Lightning Seeds) performing amongst others, tracks from the long awaited brand new Lightning Seeds album ‘Four Winds’, followed by a welcome return to the stage by pioneering band The Pretty Things. Part of the 1960’s British invasion, The Pretty Things are a cited influence of hundreds of garage bands like MC5 and The Seeds. The evening event features New York’s hottest export, School of Seven Bells – one of the bands tipped by MOJO at the start of the year in the magazine’s 9 for ’09 feature. These dreamy purveyors of ethereal electronic rock are made up of Benjamin Curtis of Secret Machines and identical twins Alejandra and Claudia Deheza. Closing the event and raising the roof of HMV’s flagship store are Leicester agitators Kasabian who will preview material from their hugely anticipated third album, ‘West Ryder Pauper Lunatic Asylum’. The album, produced by Dan The Automator, is due out on June 8 and has been described by MOJO as an album that is both ‘mystic’ and ‘mental’ in equal measure.

WEDNESDAY 6 MAY
HMV, 150 OXFORD STREET, LONDON

12:30 – IAN BROUDIE (LIGHTNING SEEDS)
13:30 – THE PRETTY THINGS
18:00 – SCHOOL OF SEVEN BELLS
19:00 – KASABIAN

The Low Anthem announce UK festival dates

the-low-anthemWith tickets selling fast for their two shows at the Slaughtered Lamb next month, and with a much bigger London date currently being scheduled for June, THE LOW ANTHEM have just announced news of numerous UK festival appearances this summer.  The Low Anthem will be performing at Glastonbury, Hard Rock Calling, Wireless, End Of The Road and Bestival, info below,

Wednesday 13 May – LONDON – The Slaughtered Lamb
Thursday 14 May – LONDON – The Slaughtered Lamb
Saturday 16 May – BRIGHTON – Horatios @ The Great Escape

Friday 26 June – GLASTONBURY – Glastonbury Festival (Q Stage)
Saturday 27 June – GLASTONBURY – Glastonbury Festival (Park Stage)
Sunday 28 June – LONDON – Hard Rock Calling

Saturday 4 July – LONDON – Wireless Festival

Friday 11 September – DORSET – End of the Road Festival
Saturday 12 September – DORSET – End of the Road Festival
Sunday 13 September – ISLE OF WIGHT – Bestival

THE LOW ANTHEM look set to be one of the success stories of 2009, Their sublime music ranges from evocative folk ballads sung in gorgeous falsettos to garage-roots rockers in a Tom Waits bar-room style, The Low Anthem are a folk rock trio from Providence, Rhode Island, United States. They formed in 2003 and consist of multi-instrumentalists Ben Miller, Jeff Prystowsky and Jocie Adams. The Low Anthem began as a contemporary folk duet from Providence, RI. Member’s Ben Miller and Jeff Prystowsky met playing in the wood-bat leagues of rural Connecticut in 2003. They began a collaboration with classical composer Jocie Adams in November 2007. Their landmark 2007 release “What the Crow Brings” was independently produced by the band and has received great acclaim from major press across the country. Their rapidly expanding fan-base spans all ages remarkably, as the duo appeals to hipsters, housewives and grandparents equally. Writers have typically drawn comparisons to Tom Waits, Neil Young, and Bob Dylan, but you will hear strains in their music from remote Appalachia to the Delta; an urban immediacy, and a timeless grounding in the great American roots music traditions. Rolling Stone says the music on Charlie Darwin feels “homemade” and “solemnly beautiful,” and NPR Music called the song “To Ohio” a “tender stunner” in choosing it as a Song of the Day, saying, “At times languid and haunting, but with detours into Tom Waits-esque stomping and hollering, The Low Anthem’s music seems equally informed by Simon & Garfunkel, Bob Dylan, The Band and a late-night ride home in Joni Mitchell’s car.” The band recently performed six sets at SXSW, where the BBC called them “stunning” and said, “Expect much flowerier words of praise thrown on this band in the future; they deserve everything said about them.” Mojo describe their set as “heartbreaking” and called the band, “truly startling songwriters and instrumentalists. Theirs is a gloriously romantic vision of America that sits somewhere between Dylan and Waits.” The New York Times wrote: “At the Central Presbyterian Church, the Low Anthem, from Providence, R.I., harmonized on slow, sustained songs — often waltzes — using instruments like harmonium, clarinet, some kind of small euphonium and a set of metal
discs played with a bow for eerie high tones, perfect accompaniment for lines like “Oh, my God, the water’s all around.” Most of the music was stately and mournful, with lyrics contemplating faith, loss, destruction and self-destruction in visionary imagery: “They say the sky’s the limit/The sky’s about to fall.” Every so often, making the quiet songs sound even quieter, the Low Anthem played something electric, bluesy and distorted, but equally serene in its desolation.” The Low Anthem, which recently signed to Nonesuch, has shared the stage with Rachael Yamagata, Lisa Hannigan, Ray Lamontagne and Elvis Perkins in Dearland. This summer they will re-release Oh My God Charlie Darwin with Nonesuch and Bella Union in Europe, and will play Bonnaroo, Glastonbury, and Hyde Park festival in London with Bruce Springsteen and the Dave Matthews Band.

http://www.myspace.com/lowanthem

Michael Sarver got a crude awakening Thursday night from his “American Idol” life.

michael_sarverThe 27-year-old oil rig worker from Jasper, Texas, made his final plea by belting out “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg,” but it just wasn’t slick enough for the judges to overrule the votes of viewers. Sarver was also in the bottom two last week, and put on a consensus weak performance in Wednesday night’s performance round. Even sugary-sweet Paula Abdul chimed in, comparing the 27-year-old oil rig worker from Jasper, Texas, to an old-school Vegas lounge act. His unrefined reprisal of the Temptations classic didn’t appear to tempt the judges to spend their one-time save of a low-vote getter. The four got their heads together for a moment, then Simon Cowell told the married father of two children: “Michael, you’re going home. Sorry.”  Matt Giraud, 23, of Kalamazoo, Mich., was the other bottom vote-getter, despite the judges’ positive appraisal of his “Let’s Get it On” by Marvin Gaye.  Stevie Wonder kept the Motown mojo of this week’s show going by singing a medley of his songs, energizing both the contestants — who were dancing and grooving along — and audience.  The nine contestants who remain on the Fox network’s singing competition are Allison Iraheta, Adam Lambert, Anoop Desai, Danny Gokey, Kris Allen, Lil Rounds, Matt Giraud, Megan Corkrey and Scott MacIntyre.

Fox pushed this week’s “American Idol” broadcasts back a day to steer clear of President Obama’s prime-time news conference on Tuesday night.

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