Michael Lynche

Lee DeWyze Is The New “American Idol”

Lee DeWyze Is The New "American Idol"

Lee DeWyze Is The New "American Idol"

Lee DeWyze is the next “American Idol,” beating out Crystal Bowersox for the top prize and a recording contract. The 24-year-old singer performed a smooth set with the 8-time multi-platinum band Chicago as he wowed fans for the win. Bowersox offered a pair of songs with Canadian rocker Alanis Morissette, who showed up for a live duet on the final episode. In the closing tune, Bowersox and DeWyze performed ‘A Little Help From My Friends’ with Joe Cocker. However, enthusiasm has waned for the show, with only 19 million viewers tuning in to watch their final performances on May 25, the lowest rating since the show began in 2002. Even the crowd at the live performance seemed a bit jaded. An ailing Bret Michaels walked onto the stage to sing a duet with a formerly booted Idol contestant, and the crowd barely got up to their feet.  Although, the highlight was a duet between infamous former contestants Gen. Larry Platt and William Hung singing the protest song ‘Pants on the Ground.’ A return visit from former judge Paula Abdul also got the crowd going as she bantered with Simon.  Simon himself gave his final bow, serenaded by the full collection of Idols singing ‘Together We are One.’  For those who don’t want the action to stop, the Live Tour will kick off this summer with nationwide stops bringing the Top 10 finalists and their favorite songs.“American Idols LIVE!” tour 2010 will feature contestants Aaron Kelly, Andrew Garcia, Casey James, Crystal Bowersox, Didi Benami, Katie Stevens, Lee DeWyze, Michael Lynche, Siobhan Magnus, and Tim Urban. The road show will kick off in Auburn Hills, Michigan and will end at the in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on September 14.

Matthew Fox, on the LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN, CBS

Matthew Fox, on the LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN, CBS

Matthew Fox, on the LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN, CBS

Matthew Fox, on the LATE SHOW WITH DAVID LETTERMAN, CBS.   Mo 5/17: Matthew Fox, Zac Brown Band, “American Idol” castoff Michael Lynche, Jason Randal.   Matthew Fox,  handsome actor with leading-man looks and charisma to spare, one only wonders why it took actor Matthew Fox’s career over a decade to finally set sail with his starring role as natural-born leader Jack on the hit ABC series Lost. Commanding the screen as the brave but conflicted organizer of a group of airplane-crash survivors stranded on a mysterious island, Fox played no small part in bringing compelling drama back to the small screen in a time when reality television seemed to dominate the dial. Of course, Lost wasn’t Fox’s first foray into television drama, having previously established himself as one of five siblings prematurely thrust into adulthood when their parents are killed by a drunk driver in the Golden Globe-winning Party of Five, but it did find him excelling in a manner that could point to a long and fruitful career. Unlike many actors who realize their calling early in life, in the Wyoming native’s early years, it seemed as if an acting career was the absolute farthest thing imaginable in terms of future job prospects. Fox was raised on a ranch that raised horses and barley, and when it came time to choose a college, he opted to study economics at Columbia University — where he also made quite a name for himself on the gridiron.  All arrows pointed to a prosperous future career on Wall Street, but when Fox was convinced to try his hand at modeling, the chips seemed to fall into place, and he was soon appearing on television commercials and essaying guest appearances on such popular sitcoms as Wings. In 1992, Fox went back to college for a role in the short-lived TV comedy Freshman Dorm, and though that show itself was decidedly short-lived, it helped his career by leading to roles in the film My Boyfriend’s Back, the made-for-television feature If I Die Before I Wake, and, eventually, Party of Five. After his wining performance in Party of Five making Fox a familiar face to television viewers, it seemed only a matter of time before he stuck out on his own. Following a touching turn opposite Donald Sutherland in the made-for-television drama Behind the Mask, Fox took the role of an ex-policeman-turned-private investigator whose near-death experience bridges a gap to the spirit world in the supernaturally charged series Haunted, which was quickly canceled despite the fact that it was beginning to see a dedicated fan base. If Fox’s career seemed to be floundering somewhat in the wake of Party of Five, that would certainly change when Lost debuted on ABC to impressive ratings in late 2004. With his role as the reluctant leader proving once and for all that Fox had what it took to be a leading man, long-time fans could rest assured that they would likely be seeing much more of him in the future.

“American Idols LIVE!” Tour To Kick Off In July

Lee DeWyze

Lee DeWyze

“American Idols LIVE!” Tour To Kick Off In July.  “American Idol” is set to embark on its annual tour with the season’s Top 10 finalists. Beginning July 1st, the aspiring singers will be gearing up for an extensive North American road show. “American Idols LIVE!” tour 2010 will feature contestants Aaron Kelly, Andrew Garcia, Casey James, Crystal Bowersox, Didi Benami, Katie Stevens, Lee DeWyze, Michael Lynche, Siobhan Magnus, and Tim Urban. The road show will kick off at the Palace of Auburn Hills in Auburn Hills, MI and will end at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, PA on September 14. Tickets will be sold from May 15.  Meanwhile, the show’s special “Idol Gives Back” fundraising effort was able to raise almost $45 million last week. The money will benefit various U.S. and international charities, such as Children’s Health Fund, Malaria No More, Save the Children’s U.S. Programs, Feeding America, and United Nations Foundation.

“American Idols LIVE!” Tour 2010 schedule:
•7/1 – Palace of Auburn Hills, Aurburn Hills, MI
•7/2 – Summerfest, Milwaukee, WI
•7/3 – Van Andel Arena, Grand Rapids, MI
•7/5 – Copps Coliseum, Hamilton, ON
•7/7 – Nikon at jOnes Beach, Wantagh, NY
•7/10 – Mark G. Etess Arena, Atlantic City, NJ
•7/11 – Wachovia Center, Philadelphia, PA
•7/13 – Mohegan Sun Arena, Uncasville, CT
•7/14 – Verizon Wireless Arena, Manchester, NH
•7/15 – Giant Center, Hershey, PA
•7/17 – Times Union Center, Albany, NY
•7/18 – Comcast Center, Mansfield, MA
•7/20 – Prudential Center, Newark, NJ
•7/23 – Jiffy Lube Live, Washington, DC
•7/24 – 1st Mariner Arena, Baltimore, MD
•7/25 – Verizon Wireless Amphitheater, Charlotte, NC
•7/27 – Nationwide Arena, Columbus, OH
•7/28 – Thompson-Boiling Arena, Knoxville, TN
•7/29 – Virginia Beach Amphitheater, Virginia Beach, VA
•7/31 – Rupp Arena, Lexington, KY
•8/1 – Arena at Gwinnett Center, Duluth, GA
•8/3 – BankAtlantic Center, Sunrise, FL
•8/4 – St. Pete Times Forum, Tampa, FL
•8/7 – Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion, Houston, TX
•8/8 – BOK Center, Tulsa, OK
•8/9 – American Airlines Center, Dallas, TX
•8/12 – US Airways Center, Phoenix, AZ
•8/13 – Staples Center, Los Angeles, CA
•8/14 – Shoreline Amphitheater at Mountainview, Mountainview, CA
•8/16 – Viejas Arena, San Diego, CA
•8/17 – Honda Center, Anaheim, CA
•8/18 – ARCO Arena, Sacramento, CA
•8/20 – Key Arena, Seattle, WA
•8/21 – Rose Garden, Portland, OR
•8/23 – Comfort Dental Amphitheater, Denver, CO
•8/25 – Sprint Center, Kansas City, MO
•8/26 – Qwest Center, Omaha, NE
•8/27 – Scottrade Center, St. Louis, MO
•8/29 – Target Center, Minneapolis, MN
•8/30 – United Center, Chicago, IL
•8/31 – Wells Fargo Arena, Des Moines, IA
•9/2 – The Huntington Center, Toledo, OH
•9/3 – Riverbend Music Center, Cincinnati, OH
•9/4 – Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis, IN
•9/7 – MTS Centre, Winnipeg, MB
•9/10 – HSBC Arena, Buffalo, NY
•9/11 – Quicken Loans Arena, Cleveland, OH
•9/13 – Arena at Harbor Yard, Bridgeport, CT
•9/14 – Consol Energy Center, Pittsburgh, PA

Sadly, Tim Urban has to leave American Idols.

Sadly, Tim Urban has to leave American Idols.

Sadly, Tim Urban has to leave American Idols.

 American Idol Top 6 results have been announced last night and Sadly Tim Urban has to leave the Top 7. It’s not good news for Tim fans but according to results Tim had to leave the show. Its game rule so everyone has to follow it and on elimination show someone has to leave.   We know it’s very difficult to leave a show like American Idol. On elimination show Tim Urban sang “Better Days” but his performance was not so much impressive and judges didn’t like it. This week Aaron Kelly, Casey James and Tim Urban were in bottom three and they had to wait for two hours for the results. So Kelly was safe for one more week but she will have to work really very hard.  On Wednesday Annie Lennox was also appeared on the show as a guest and she performed live. The elimination show began with President Obama brief speech about aiding. He said, “To this year’s finalists, as Randy says, “You’re all my dawgs,” Yesterday Tim’s dream to be the next American Idol ended as he couldn’t get the audience support and received a few votes. For his singing he was constantly criticized by judges but in the and Tim said no matter if he couldn’t fulfill his dream but this show has been one of the biggest turning points of his life. Top six contestants are Crystal Bowersox, James and Kelly, Lee Dewyze, Siobhan Magnus and Michael Lynche.

‘American Idol’ – ‘Top 8 Boys Compete’ Recap

aaron kelly, AaronKelly, alex lambert, AlexLambert, andrew garcia, AndrewGarcia, casey james, CaseyJames, ellen degeneres, EllenDegeneres, kara dioguardi, KaraDioguardi, michael lynche, MichaelLynche, randy jackson, RandyJackson, ryan seacrest, RyanSeacrest, simon cowell, SimonCowell, tim urban, TimUrban, todrick hall, TodrickHall

aaron kelly, AaronKelly, alex lambert, AlexLambert, andrew garcia, AndrewGarcia, casey james, CaseyJames, ellen degeneres, EllenDegeneres, kara dioguardi, KaraDioguardi, michael lynche, MichaelLynche, randy jackson, RandyJackson, ryan seacrest, RyanSeacrest, simon cowell, SimonCowell, tim urban, TimUrban, todrick hall, TodrickHall

Quick! Someone explain to Simon what a “binky” is. After a weird show opening on Tuesday involving Ellen sitting on his lap, Ryan starts the show on Wednesday asking why Kara and Simon are sitting so close together this season. He then calls Kara Simon’s “binky,” which confuses Simon greatly. All in all, the lady judges cannot get enough of Mr. Cowell this week. Tonight’s episode is really exciting, because for the first time so far, it’s going to be kind of difficult to find two contestants to eliminate. Overall it’s a strong night of performances, with a couple of pleasant surprises. I definitely have my favorite, how about you?

Lee Dewyze is singing ‘Fireflies,’ but it’s not the amazing Rhett Miller song, so I’m already disappointed. He’s fine, but it’s not a particularly interesting performance. Turns out, it’s an Adam Young song, and the judges must be in a good mood this week, because Randy and Ellen both praise him. Kara even goes so far as to say that he made it a better song. Simon, however, dials it down a little bit and tells Lee that he “didn’t have a moment” with that song, but is generally positive.

Alex Lambert, on the other hand, is singing ‘Trouble,’ a song I actually like. His mullet is so distracting however, that it’s hard to enjoy it. Also making it difficult is the fact that he’s singing the song completely out of his nose. He’s always kind of nasally, but it’s so, so intense this week. Randy wished he would have slowed the song down a little bit, while Ellen says he gets “better and better every week.” She also warns him against becoming “a cocky banana,” but let’s not talk about that. Kara tells him that the only thing standing in the way of his winning is him, because he’s “not letting go.” Simon tells him that he needs to relax and picture Randy in a bikini. Let’s just move on, shall we?

Tim Urban is singing Jeff Buckley’s version of ‘Hallelujah,’ which is a hard song to touch. Tim hasn’t exactly been setting the stage on fire the past several weeks, so this is definitely a risky choice for him. While it doesn’t come close to Buckley’s version in terms of pure, heartbreaking beauty, it’s certainly the best performance I’ve seen from Tim so far. If he’s made it this far in the competition spouting the nonsense he’s been singing the past several weeks, he definitely deserves to advance based on this. Randy seems to agree, saying that he’s got some big shoes to fill, but he did a good job. Ellen tells Tim that she feels as though she’s been criticizing him a lot lately, so she actually gets up, runs to the stage, hugs him and tells him that he was fantastic. When she gets up, poor Tim looks like a terrified little bunny, and it’s all kind of hilarious. Kara tells him that he’s “in it,” while Simon takes credit for him doing so well.

Andrew Garcia peaked early during Hollywood week with ‘Straight Up,’ so doing ‘Genie in a Bottle’ is kind of risky. He’s covered Adele and Alicia Keys since then, and while this is his most successful re-imagining since ‘Straight Up,’ he’s veering dangerously close to gimmick alley over here. Randy liked the choice, but it didn’t quite work for him. Ellen says that the “genie came out of the bottle too late,” and while Kara can appreciate what he did with this song, she says that he was fighting with the rhythm of the guitar. Simon calls it “a little bit desperate,” and tells him that he’s still going backwards a little bit.

Casey James is singing a song with which I am not familiar, Keith Urban’s ‘You’ll Think of Me,’ so I have no expectations going into it. This also means that I can’t really compare it to the original. However, just going into it blind, I really enjoy Casey’s performance. It didn’t totally rock my world, but it was a simple, honest, and most of all, strong performance. Randy says that it was a safe choice, but Ellen thinks that it was great. Kara is kind of back on the Casey train, which I’m sure her husband will be thrilled about. Simon tells Casey that this performance was his “second best,” and it made him sincere. However, it wasn’t terribly memorable.

Aaron Kelly is singing ‘I’m Already There,’ which just screams “wedding reception” to me. He starts off super-shaky. He seems off-key and mumbles the first couple of lines. He picks up steam during the chorus, but the whole thing is just kind of cheesy to me. Randy says that there’s still some work to do, but that it was a job well done. Ellen loves the way he carries himself, but says that it was a little “too much song for him.” Kara loves him, but says the song isn’t relevant to his life. Simon, however tells Kara that what she said is “complete and utter rubbish.” He says that it wasn’t a great vocal, but it was a perfect song choice.

Todrick Hall is singing Queen, and I’m interested to see what he does with it. ‘Somebody to Love’ is probably one of my favorite Queen songs, and I’m excited going into Todrick’s performance. He starts off with a pretty sweet high note. The first few lines don’t quite do it for me, but he quickly gets comfortable and does a really interesting soulful version. I love what he does, but it seems as though when I like what Todrick does, the judges feel the exact opposite. However, Randy simply says, “Todrick is back,” and praises him effusively. Ellen says he was brave. She wishes he would have committed to making it more of a gospel song, but really enjoyed it. Kara tells him he sang it well, but says that she didn’t know whether to laugh or love it at times, which seems a little harsh. Simon tells him that it was good in parts, but that he told them that he’s more of a Broadway singer than a recording artist. However, he also says that this song may have saved him.

Michael Lynche is singing ‘This Woman’s Work’ and starts with a very daring falsetto. While he shows a different side vocally than we’ve really seen from him in this competition, the performance kind of bores me, despite the fact that he does an admirable job with the vocals. Randy, however, loved it and pretty much has a seizure while praising him. Ellen tells Big Mike that he’s the one to beat, and Kara is literally in tears. I should probably watch this performance again, because I clearly missed something the first time around. Simon tells him that this was “so needed tonight,” and that he 100% nailed it. Meanwhile, Kara still can’t get it together. I’ve never quite seen a reaction like this before. UPDATE: Okay, I actually went back and watched the performance. I turned the volume up, and now I see where the judges were coming from. It didn’t quite move me to tears, but it showed a range and an emotion that we really haven’t seen from Mike before. It was a daring performance, and he absolutely pulled it off. In any case, it was a great way to end the show.

“American Idol” entered its always risky semifinal phase

Tyler Grady

Tyler Grady

Last week, “American Idol” entered its always risky semifinal phase and plunged right into territory that made it seem like yet another remake of the “Poseidon Adventure”. Our favorite television pleasure vessel sure seemed to be taking on water, and fast: Nearly every contestant cringed and caterwauled through foolish song selections, and the judges only made things worse with flat comments, rude clowning and utterly undisguised pessimism. The general tackiness of the two performance nights, followed by the voting off of Tyler Grady, the one kid confident enough to show some Sanjaya-style sangfroid, suggested that this season might capsize the franchise completely. But what is serial television, if not a renewable resource? The programs that make a lasting impact often flounder, only to be rescued by some new plot line, performer or simple twist of fate. Tuesday night’s “Idol” felt like a save, if only a partial one. Forced to perform a day earlier than expected  because of female contestant Crystal Bowersox’s unexpected illness, the remaining male hopefuls came closer to finding themselves. There were memorable performances, and the judges seemed happy and hopeful. The guys mostly came through by focusing on the very idea of what makes a man powerful — a singing man, that is, whose charisma doesn’t always fulfill the stereotypes of virility — and it added up to a valuable glimpse into the nature of pop masculinity right now.  Michael Lynche set the tone with a gesture that, like the gentle giant himself, was both completely forthright and a little surprising. After admitting a youthful penchant for musical theater, he quickly reasserted his macho bona fides by announcing his selection: “It’s a Man’s Man’s Man’s World,” by James Brown. The Godfather of Soul! It doesn’t get more patriarchal than that. What was excellent about Big Mike’s take on the signature ballad of funk’s pomaded Zeus was the way it worked against the song’s easy associations. Brown preached it like the gospel revisionist he was, punctuating every phrase with a near-operatic verve. (In fact, he once performed the song with Luciano Pavarotti.) Lynche started out with a band, but toned down the song’s aggressiveness by leaning into its darker notes, recalling sophisticated bluesmen such as Robert Cray, whose music speaks of the burdens of traditional manhood as much as its power. Lynche’s turn was the night’s most sophisticated, but he had company in the game of employing pop’s favorite male archetypes to gain emotional, if not always musical, ground. Not John Park, sadly, who just can’t find the right vehicle for his rich, precise instrument. And not Andrew Garcia, the early favorite who stumbled trying on a few classic soul moves of his own. Elsewhere, though, guy-pop cliches abounded and were enlivened (marginally, at times) by the earnestness of the young strivers trying them on.   The Rocker Dude appeared in version both Classic and 2.0. First, Casey James busted out a few squealy but potent electric guitar licks to toughen up Gavin DeGraw’s bubbly “I Don’t Want To Be”; and then, in the coveted final spot, Lee DeWyze laid claim to the one rock stance that has proved triumphant on “Idol” — the Nickelback groan — by covering Hinder’s “Lips of an Angel” with such note-wrecking sincerity that it caused visions of Cookies to dance in Simon’s head.  The judge declared that DeWyze has the best male voice on the show, which is poppycock. What the former Extreme Karaoke regular has is that heavy, battered tone, the one that means manliness now, in an era of beaten-down average Joes. It will likely take him far, for better or worse.   Maybe this year’s generally panicked mood (both on “Idol” and in the larger world) is why DeWyze’s mirror opposites, the gender benders, aren’t faring well. Also, both are African American this year, and thus less likely to appeal to the Queen and Bowie fans, nostalgic for their youth, who supported the great Adam Lambert.    I wish the Idol voters — and judges — would more readily applaud Todrick Hall and Jermaine Sellers for the risks they’re taking. Hall’s theatricality and overt challenges to the masculine paradigm — twice now, he’s performed songs made famous by women — deserve more than the casual dismissals he’s getting from the judges’ table. And Sellers, though less cerebral, is exploring a falsetto range that, with proper vocal coaching, could be really exquisite. But, defensive as he is — he declared God on his side this evening, inviting Simon to church —  he’s never going to get there without at least one judge standing up for his pure talent. They’re too busy, right now at least, encouraging Aaron Kelly and Tim Urban, this year’s milk-fed pretty white boys, both of whom showed signs of getting into their lanes as teen idols on this show. Kelly ingeniously erased the context of a soul classic (“My Girl,” by the Temptations), rendering it as clean as Tom Sawyer’s fence. Urban, who seemed marked for death after a horrible turn last week, sold himself as the lost Jonas Brother, and this trick of association probably earned him another week.    Puppy lovers, man’s men, peacocks, dirty-sweet bad boys — the male Idols played their roles well, if predictably. As usual, however, the best turn of the night came from outside the frame. After a painful introductory segment in which he talked about vomiting before his performances — a tendency, sadly, more often pegged as feminine — Alex Lambert took his place under the spotlight armed with an acoustic guitar and a song by John Legend, a guy who wears his own masculinity lightly and without fuss. He sang, in that slightly strange, androgynous voice of his, without the slightest hint of swagger or bluster. He seemed thoughtful and sweet. A person worth getting to know better.


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