Kevin Shields

Paul Weller to ‘Wake Up The Nation’

Paul Weller releases his tenth studio solo album “Wake Up The Nation” on April 12th on Island Records. After an unparalleled career, characterised by constant musical experimentation, we should be used to Paul Weller’s relentless desire to chop and change his musical pack. But after the triumphant, Brit-bagging success of 22 Dreams (his third solo number one) Wake Up The Nation album sees rock’s most iconic songwriter come up trumps once more.  Lean, mean and as uncompromisingly focused as it’s maker, Wake Up The Nation also brings Paul Weller full circle: twenty-eight years on from The Jam’s split, two tracks feature the former bassist Bruce Foxton. The album also sees contributions from My Bloody Valentine’s Kevin Shields, The Move’s Bev Bevan and legendary session drummer Clem Cattini. Passion, progression, and, as ever, spine-tingling rock’n'roll -Paul Weller has, yet again delivered the perfect soundtrack as we embark on a new decade.

Wake Up The Nation’s 16 tracks are:

MOONSHINE
WAKE UP THE NATION
NO TEARS TO CRY
FAST CAR / SLOW TRAFFIC
ANDROMEDA
IN AMSTERDAM
SHE SPEAKS
FIND THE TORCH, BURN THE PLANS
AIM HIGH
TREES
GRASP AND STILL CONNECT
WHATEVER NEXT
7&3 IS THE STRIKERS NAME
UP THE DOSAGE
PIECES OF A DREAM
TWO FAT LADIES

A double A side single featuring ‘Wake Up The Nation’ and ‘No Tears To Cry’ will be released on April 5th. New tour and festival dates will be announced soon. In the interim, Paul plays 5 sold out nights at the Royal Albert Hall from 24 – 28th May.

Read more about My Bloody Valentine before you see them at Coachella.

my_bloody_valentineLike the Velvet Underground, Sonic Youth, and the Jesus & Mary Chain before them, My Bloody Valentine redefined what noise meant within the context of pop songwriting.  Led by guitarist Kevin Shields, the group released several EPs in the mid-’80s before recording the era-defining Isn’t Anything in 1988, a record that merged lilting, ethereal melodies of the Cocteau Twins with crushingly loud, shimmering distortion. Though My Bloody Valentine rejected rock & roll conventions, it didn’t subscribe to the precious tendencies of anti-rock art-pop bands. Instead, it rode crashing waves of white noise to unpredictable conclusions, particularly since their noise wasn’t paralyzing like the typical avant-garde noise-rock band: It was translucent, glimmering, and beautiful. Shields was a perfectionist, especially when it came to recording, as much of My Bloody Valentine’s sound was conceived within the studio itself. Nevertheless, the band was known as a formidible live act, even though they rarely moved, or even looked at the audience, while they were on-stage. Their notorious lack of movement was branded “shoegazing” by the British music press, and soon there were legions of other shoegazers — Ride, Lush, the Boo Radleys, Chapterhouse, Slowdive — that, along with the rolling dance-influenced Madchester scene, dominated British indie-rock of the late ’80s and early ’90s. As shoegazing reached its peak in 1991, My Bloody Valentine released Loveless, which broke new sonic ground and was hailed as a masterpiece. Though the band was poised for a popular breakthrough, they disappeared into the studio and didn’t emerge over the next five years, leaving behind a legacy that proved profoundly influential in the direction of ’90s alternative rock. Born in Queens, New York, Kevin Shields’ family moved to Dubin, Ireland when he was six years old. In his teens, he became obsessed with pop music, eventually playing in Complex with his childhood friend Colm O’Ciosoig. In 1984, Shields and O’Ciosoig formed My Bloody Valentine with vocalist Dave Conway and keyboardist Tina, taking their name from a slasher horror film. The group relocated to Berlin, where they released the Birthday Party-influenced EP This Is Your Bloody Valentine on the Tycoon label in 1985 to little notice. The following year, the band moved to London, where they added bassist Debbie Googe. By the summer, they had signed to Fever and had released the EP Geek!, which again was ignored. Later that year, the group moved to Kaledoscope Sound, releasing The New Record By My Bloody Valentine EP, which illustrated a Jesus & Mary Chain influence. The following year, the band moved to the Primitives’ Lazy Records, releasing Sunny Sundae Smile early in the year. That EP was the first My Bloody Valentine record to mesh airy melodies with grinding guitars, but the two EPs that followed in 1987 — Strawberry Wine and Ecstasy — were more focused and acclaimed. Conway left the band by the end of the year and was replaced by vocalist/guitarist Bilinda Butcher, whose breathy vocals fit the group’s evolving sound more appropriately.

My Bloody Valentine’s new sound coalesced with the group’s first full-fledged album, 1988′s Isn’t Anything. Released on Creation Records, Isn’t Anything was greeted with enthusiastic reviews in the UK music press and the band’s following increased dramatically by the end of the year; in fact, their repuation had become large enough to attract the attention of Sire/Warner Bros. in the US, who became the group’s American label. Two other EPs, Feed Me With Your Kiss and You Made Me Realise, were also quite popular, and by the beginning of 1989, bands that based their sound on My Bloody Valentine’s droning swirl began to appear. The group retreated to the studio in 1989 to record their followup, which meant that only one EP, Glider, was released during that year. By the spring of 1990, it was becoming clear that the followup to Isn’t Anything wouldn’t be appearing anytime soon, and reports about Shields’ growing perfectionism began to circulate in the UK weekly music press. Soon, it became apparent that the band’s lengthy recording sessions were crippling Creation Records, but the group’s audience was still passionate, despite the inactivity: The Tremolo EP was released at the end of 1990 to considerable acclaim, and managed to climb into the UK Top 40.

When My Bloody Valentine’s second album, Loveless, finally appeared in late 1991, it was greeted with uniformly excellent reviews and it became a hit within the UK, reaching number 24 on the charts. In America, the group made significant inroads, particularly by supporting Dinosaur Jr. Despite the band’s acclaim and growing audience, Loveless didn’t sell in numbers to recoup its reported $500,000 recording cost and Creation dropped the band from their label; Creation wouldn’t fully recover until 1994, when they signed Oasis. My Bloody Valentine signed with Island and entered the studio at the end of 1992 to record a new album. In 1993, the group contributed a James Bond cover to a charity compilation.

And then … nothing happened.

Shields built a home studio with his Island advance and reportedly completed two separate albums, but scrapped them both. Often, the studio ran into technological problems. Between 1993 and 1997, both Googe and O’Ciosoig left the band, leaving only Shields and Butcher; after driving a cab for about a year, Googe formed Snowpony in 1996. There were signs that My Bloody Valentine were emerging from hiding in 1996, when the group contributed to the Wire tribute album Whore and Shields played on Experimental Audio Research’s Beyond the Pale. Still, no new My Bloody Valentine material appeared.

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