Jimmy Page

Jane’s Addiction inducted into Hollywood’s Guitar Center Rockwalk

Perry Farrell, Dave Navarro and Stephen Perkins of Jane’s Addiction were inducted into the Guitar Center RockWalk in Hollywood yesterday (June 1, 2011).

Perry, Dave and Stephen rocked up to RockWalk for their induction with a speech from Rage Against The Machine’s Tom Morello.

Their handprints are now part of the walk together with those from Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Elvis Presley, Carlos Santana, Johnny Cash, Van Halen, AC/DC, Bonnie Raitt, Aerosmith, Carl Perkins, Marvin Gaye, James Brown, B.B. King, Stevie Wonder, Queen and Run DMC.

Jane’s Addiction will now participate in the Guitar Center unsigned artist program where one unsigned band will win the opportunity to open for the band when they launch their summer tour.

Jane’s Addiction will release their next album ‘The Great Escape’ in August. It will be the band’s first album since ‘Strays’ in 2003.

2010 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees.

Red Hot Chili PeppersRed Hot Chili Peppers, LL Cool J, Kiss Lead 2010 Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominees. The ballot for next year’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame class is one of the most diverse ever: the Red Hot Chili Peppers, LL Cool J, Kiss and Genesis are up for nomination alongside the Stooges, Donna Summer, ABBA, Darlene Love, Laura Nyro, the Chantels, the Hollies and Jimmy Cliff. Artists are eligible for induction 25 years after their debut release, so all the candidates released their first single no later than 1984. LL Cool J and the Red Hot Chili Peppers both made the ballot on their first year of eligibility.  This is Kiss’ first time on the ballot, and their wait for a nod has frustrated the band and its army of fans. “There are disco Continue reading →

Jack White goes it alone

jack_whiteonrtvJACK WHITE has revealed that he is releasing a solo single.  The guitarist – who plays with The Dead Weather and fronts The White Stripes and The Raconteurs – is to release a song called Fly Farm Blues. It came at the request of film director Davis Guggenheim while filming the music documentary ‘It Might Get Loud’ with Jimmy Page and The Edge.  The track will be released digitally via US iTunes and on a special-edition vinyl 7inch single from August 11. In addition, the ‘Steady As She Goes’ singer has produced two songs for Transit, a group made up of employees of Nashville Metro Transit Authority. ‘C’Mon And Ride’ and ‘Afterparty’ were written about the city’s bussing system. Finally, Third Man Records will also reduce two tracks Jack produced for Dan Sartain next week.

The Jonas Brothers on the cover of the Rolling Stone.

the-jonas-brothers-on-the-cover-of-the-rolling-stoneThe Jonas Brothers are men now. That’s why they’re posing like a late-’90s boy band on Rolling Stone—that’s just what men do.  • E!’s own Kendra Wilkinson offered some insight into her “sexy bachelorette/bridal shower” fun on her blog. Wish we were there.  • This OP ad with Sophia Bush and AnnaLynne McCord also appears to have surfaced from the same time period. Are we time traveling? Is this real life?  • Everyone’s still trying to beat Emma Watson to her college announcement. Right now, the Internet’s money is on Columbia.  •  Kodakis working on reuniting Megan Fox with the Rose Boy so they can have an awkward, feel-good moment that will inspire us all to buy more Kodak.  • Breckin Meyer makes fun of the Perez Hilton postpunch webcam crying video and then Zac Efron pops up in this Funny or Die vid.

 In the Studio as Phish
Capture Their Live Vibe
Inside the band’s sessions for “Joy.”

Def Leppard, Cheap Trick,
Poison Launch Triple Bill
Photos from their riff-heavy debut.

“Transformers” Sequel
Proves “Galactically Stupid”
Peter Travers deems it “beyond bad.”

Ray Davies: Kinks Film a Go,
But Reunion Seems Unlikely
“I gotta tell you – I miss the Kinks.”

Blink-182, Weezer Headline
Virgin’s First Free Festival
Franz Ferdinand, Public Enemy also on bill.

Jimmy Page, Jack White,
The Edge Unite for New Doc
Film captures guitar hero summit.

Metallica shoved the mosh pit into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

metallicaHeavy metal’s heaviest hitters, whose menacing, monstrous sound has banged heads around the globe for decades, were inducted into rock’s shrine on Saturday night, capping a star-studded ceremony that felt much more like a concert than an awards show.  For the first time, the no-holds-barred show, back in Cleveland following a 12-year holdover in New York’s Waldorf-Astoria ballroom, was open to the public. And nearly 5,000 fans partied in the balconies inside renovated Public Auditorium as 1,200 VIPs dined below at tables costing as much $50,000 each.  Many of the came to pay homage to Metallica, which earned top billing in an eclectic 2009 class that included rap pioneers Run-DMC, virtuoso guitarist Jeff Beck, soul singer Bobby Womack and rhythm and blues vocal group Little Anthony and the Imperials.

Metallica’s members have survived some of the dark themes — death, destruction and desolation — that threads through its music, and their induction was a chance to celebrate their legacy as perhaps the hardest band to ever walk the earth. The event also served as a reunion as bassist Jason Newsted, who left the group in 2001, joined his former bandmates on stage for seering versions of “Master of Puppets” and “Enter Sandman.”  “Whatever the intangibles elements are that make a band the best, Metallica has them,” said Red Hot Chili Peppers bassist Flea, who delivered a heartfelt speech in presenting the band. He recalled being on tour and hearing Metallica on the radio for the first time. “My mind was blown. It wasn’t punk rock. It wasn’t heavy metal. It just stood by itself,” he said. “I didn’t know what it was, but I knew it was a mighty thing.” In accepting their awards, Metallica’s members were joined by Ray Burton, the father of original bassist Cliff Burton, who died tragically in 1986 when the band’s tour bus skidded off an icy road in Sweden.  “Dream big and dare to fail, because this is living proof that it is possible to make a dream come true,” said frontman-guitaristr James Hetfield, who then rattled off a long list of hard-rocking bands he feels deserve induction. “Deep Purple, Thin Lizzy, Rush, Kiss, Ted Nugent, Iron Maiden, Motorhead. We’d like to invite them through the door,” said Hetfield, who concluded his remarks by wrapping Ulrich in a bear hug.  The evening ended with a jam for the ages as Metallica, Beck, Jimmy Page, Aerosmith’s Joe Tyler and Flea brought the house down with a performance of the Yardbirds’ “Train Kept A Rollin.”

A guitar virtuoso, Beck, who was previously inducted in 1992 with the Yardbirds, was put in for his solo work. Although best known for his rock accomplishments, Beck’s career has wandered a fretboard of genres ranging from blues to jazz to electronica. “Jeff’s style is totally unorthodox to the way anyone was taught,” said Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page, who presented his longtime friend. “He keeps getting better and better and better.” Beck, wearing all white, was joined on stage by Page, a fellow guitar god, who played bass during a searing rendition of Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song.”  With two turntables and a microphone, Run-DMC broke down the barriers between rock and rap. With sparse, stripped-down lyrics above pounding beats, the trio of Joseph “DJ Run” Simmons, Darryl “D.M.C.” McDaniels and Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell changed rap in the 1980s by taking the realities of the streets to the suburbs.

“They broke away from the pack by being the pack,” said rapper Eminem, looking like the band’s lost member by sporting the group’s trademark black fedora and black leather jacket. “They were the baddest of the bad and the coolest of the cool. Run-DMC changed my life.” “There’s three of them and if you grew up with hip hop like I did, they were the Beatles.”  Their remake and collaboration with Aerosmith on the rock band’s “Walk This Way” changed modern music.  “We were young guys with a new music that people thought was a fad, but we knew the culture was a way of life and we just lived it,” McDaniels said. “The music that we made then didn’t just impact friends, it impacted a generation. So I guess that’s what rock and roll does.” Any chance of a Run reunion ended with Mizell’s death in 2002, when he was shot to death outside his studio. His murder remains unsolved.  Mizell’s mother, Connie, accepted the award on his behalf.  “My baby is still doing it for me,” she said.   Simmons cited “so many smart people and so much help” several times during his speech. He also thanked Mrs. Mizell, who allowed the group to set up their equipment in her Hollis, Queens, living room.  “She never told us to turn the music down once,” Simmons said, turning to his late friend’s mom. “I’d like to thank you for that.”  Cleveland’s Womack, the son of a steelworker, is best known for his soulful voice, but he had far greater musical range as a talented songwriter and guitarist. He also branched into gospel, returning to the roots that got him his start with a family group, the Valentinos. He later played guitar for Sam Cooke.

Ron Wood of the Rolling Stones introduced Womack as “the voice that has always killed me. He brings me to tears.” Wood then recalled a night in New York when he and Womack hid as some Hells Angels gang members were roughing up Wilson Pickett. Little Anthony and the Imperials, who began their career singing on street corners in Brooklyn, N.Y., opened the program with a gorgeous medley of hits “Tears on My Pillow,” “Hurt So Bad,” and “I’m Alright.” Many in the crowd mouthed the familiar tracks as lead singer Anthony “Little Anthony” Gourdine’s falsetto filled the room.

Longtime friend Smokey Robinson presented the doo-wop group, calling their induction “long overdue.” ourdine thanked his music teacher, “wherever you are” during his induction speech. “We’ve been in this now for 50 years, and when we were kids we never imagined in our wildest dreams we’d ever be here,” he said. “Now that it’s here, the one thing we can look at and say is nobody can ever take this away from us.”  Drummer DJ Fontana and the late bassist Bill Black — both of Elvis Presley’s backup band — and keyboardist Spooner Oldham made it in the sidemen category.  Rockabilly singer Wanda Jackson was inducted as an early influence. Dubbed the “Sweet Lady with the Nasty Voice,” the 71-year-old Jackson got her start as a country singer. She was a flamboyant dresser, and her choice of skirts and high heels rankled some hardcore fans. It was Elvis Presley, whom she toured with the 1950s, who persuaded her to sing rock songs.  “She could really rock and still kept her femininity intact,” said presenter Roseanne Cash. “She’s the prototype for so many of us.”

Rockers Invade Sundance 2009: Slash, Jack White Hit Park City, Utah

rockers-invade-sundance-2009Rolling Stone’s own Peter Travers was camped out in Park City, Utah, this week for Robert Redford’s annual Sundance Film Festival. Check out his reports on his blog, the Travers Take, where he relays the story of chilling with Mike Tyson, who offered an impromptu review of Gran Torino: “I’m not stupid and I know what Clint was doin’. I respect it. But there’s something in me that wanted to see him just blow people away. Come on, I think a lot of people in the audience want to see that.”

But in addition to movie-seeing, Sundance is always about star spotting — rock-star spotting, in our case. Slash and Perry Farrell bonded, Mariah Carey and hubby Nick Cannon took in a few flicks and Wyclef Jean introduced himself to Redford (just in case this whole music thing doesn’t pan out). The White Stripes’ Jack White made the scene, as the guitar-hero documentary It Might Get Loud — featuring himself, the Edge and Jimmy Page — enjoyed its Sundance premiere. Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard was also out West, spending time with his castmates in the Jon Krasinski movie Brief Interviews With Hideous Men when he wasn’t with his fiancee, Zooey Deschanel. And Sting broke a Sundance record (and the space-time continuum) by partying with Paris Hilton and Kevin Bacon — making him one degree from … something fierce and possibly contagious.

‘Led Zeppelin will not tour – they’re over’

ledzeppelingetty6l121107‘Led Zeppelin will not tour – they’re over’ says manager
Jimmy Page’s manager says the band will not continue in any form

Jimmy Page’s manager, Peter Mensch, has said that Led Zeppelin will not tour or continue in any form – even without singer Robert Plant.

Mensch had previously said that the band would tour with Plant replaced by a new singer – but in a new interview with Music Radar he says that the band is no more.

“Led Zeppelin are over,” he said. “If you didn’t see them in 2007 [at the London O2 Arena], you missed them. It’s done. I can’t be any clearer than that.”

He added: “They tried out a few singers (to replace Plant), but no one worked out. That was it. The whole thing is completely over now. There are absolutely no plans for them to continue. Zero.

“Frankly, I wish everybody would stop talking about it.”

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