Cinderella

“Bambi” will hit Blu-ray in 2011.

"Bambi" will hit Blu-ray in 2011.

"Bambi" will hit Blu-ray in 2011.

Disney has revealed the next animated classic to receive the high-definition treatment as part of their Diamond Collection. “Bambi” will hit Blu-ray in 2011. ”Bambi,” last remastered and released in 2005, will hit the format for the first time in the Spring of 2011. It follows the already released title in the Diamond Collection “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.” “Sleeping Beauty” and “Pinocchio,” already released on Blu-ray, are expected to be part of the Diamond collection in the future. Up next to release as a Diamond Edition is “Beauty and the Beast,” which will arrive on October 5th on Blu-ray and Blu-ray/DVD combo packs. The set will feature never-before-seen deleted footage including an alternate opening, the regular and extended versions of the film, a Jordin Sparks music video, interactive features, and more. Although it has yet to be formally announced, “Fantasia” and “Fantasia 2000″ are expected to be released together on Blu-ray in December. “The Lion King” will reportedly follow the release of “Bambi” in the Fall of 2011. Other Disney classics to follow as part of the Diamond Collection include “The Little Mermaid,” “Cinderella,” “Peter Pan,” “Lady and the Tramp,” “101 Dalmatians,” and “The Jungle Book.”

Kylie Minogue thinks she may ‘never’ get married.

Kylie Minogue thinks she may 'never' get married.

Kylie Minogue thinks she may 'never' get married.

Kylie Minogue thinks she may ‘never’ get married. The Australian pop star – who is currently dating Spanish model Andres Velencoso Segura – admits a trip down the aisle is not ‘on the cards’ any time soon. She said: ‘I’m in a very happy, romantic place and Andres is so level-headed and easygoing. It’s enjoyable. He’s a good socialiser – which is good for me, because I could easily do my work, which involves so many people, then go home and stay home. I’m so boring.   ‘Who knows? It’s not on the cards now. Maybe it’s a path I’ll never go down. All I know is you can do worse than expect the unexpected. However, the ‘In My Arms’ hitmaker admits she would like to wear a Chanel wedding dress if she ever did tie the knot with Andres. She added to this month’s edition of Britain’s Elle magazine: ‘I was miffed when I was younger that my mother’s wedding dress was a straight, simply, 1960s dress that her mother had made as opposed to the Cinderella gown. For me, I don’t know – maybe Coco Chanel.’ A behind-the-scenes cover shoot interview with Kylie is available at www.elle.tv

Comedy About a Pregnancy Spices Up ABC Family

comedy-about-a-pregnancyBefore Selena Gomez, Demi Lovato, Miley Cyrus and Hillary Duff took their turns as the Walt Disney Company’s reigning adolescent queen, Lindsay Lohan was charming children and their parents as the impish twins in Disney’s 1998 remake of “The Parent Trap” and as a blossoming rocker in 2003’s “Freaky Friday.”Once Ms. Lohan left Disney’s embrace, however, she quickly became every parent’s nightmare — car wrecks, rehab, cocaine possession and, infamously, 84 minutes in jail. Now, after three years of being seen more on tabloid covers than on movie posters, Ms. Lohan returns to the Disney family this month when her latest film, “Labor Pains,” has its premiere on the ABC Family cable channel.  ABC Family, the cable channel that was founded as the Family Channel by the evangelist Pat Robertson and that is contractually obligated to run his “700 Club” talk show in perpetuity, has been tarting up its image with series like “The Secret Life of the American Teenager,” about a pregnant 15-year-old, and “Greek,” about the fraternity scene at a preppy college. It stepped up to buy television rights to “Labor Pains” from Nu Image/Millennium Films after the producers decided to take the project directly to television and then to DVD release. The film, which features Ms. Lohan as a publishing company secretary who feigns pregnancy to avoid being fired, was originally considered for theatrical release. But Ms. Lohan’s box-office potential has ebbed with the middling performance of her three most recent films — “Chapter 27,” “Georgia Rule” and “I Know Who Killed Me.” Tom Zappala, senior vice president for acquisitions at ABC Family, said that he saw an early script and felt that the romantic comedy “was a good match” for the cable channel.  “We felt like this is a movie we would have commissioned,” Mr. Zappala said, comparing it with the channel’s recent “Another Cinderella Story,” which starred Ms. Gomez. “We kept tabs on the production along the way,” he said. “She showed up on time and she knew her lines.” Asked if ABC Family, which will broadcast the movie at 8 p.m. on July 19, might see itself working with Ms. Lohan again, he replied: “We’re open to it, I think.”

Green Day album delivers trendy surprise

OUT962512In many ways, the 1980s never really died. Many modern bands use a few power chords typical to ‘80s rock, while others play around with the styles and themes of progressive rock. It does come as a bit of a surprise, though, that Green Day would take up this trend in their newest album “21st Century Breakdown.”  Perhaps this assertion is a tad unclear. It is not the case that “21st Century Breakdown” is itself some sort of compilation of ‘80s rock. The album does, however, use a great deal of musical tools reminiscent of the era. The prog stylings of an album with a story line makes some sense, what with Green Day’s previous album “American Idiot” doing the same. What makes much less sense, though, is the usage of riffs and styles commonly associated with ‘80s hair metal.  Perhaps lead singer and band frontman Billy Joe Armstrong sat in a room listening to bands such as Winger, Poison and Twisted Sister before hitting the studio. Certainly one may ask if Armstrong has had a listen to Queensrÿche’s “Operation: Mindcrime,” as much of “21st Century Breakdown”’s story is delivered in a manner similar to Queensrÿche’s own concept album. Whatever the case, Green Day certainly does more than simply experiment with new styles.  Now, this album is not nearly as silly as something by, say, Cinderella, but musically the guitar is both powerful and at times over-the-top. Songs like “21 Guns” and “Last Night on Earth” sound delightfully like power ballads relived, their musical style told anew by Green Day, and “Horseshoes and Handgrenades” embodies a kind of AC/DC rock swagger. It does stand that Green Day covered The Who’s “A Quick One While He’s Away,” which can be found on iTunes. Armstrong himself mentioned parts of the album were inspired by bands such as The Doors and Meatloaf.  Musically, this sort of style blending could be disastrous. Such an attempt is a great leap for any band, but Green Day manages to retain its own style while forging a new sound. One of the most noticeable songs on the album is “East Jesus Nowhere” (and not entirely because of the title) for its successful blending of aggressive ‘80s style and the sweeping punk-like lyrics and chorus. Fans of more classic Green Day will be pleased with “The Static Age,” which sounds much like a flashback to some of its earlier albums. The aforementioned “21 Guns” may be the album’s best, with its stop-and-start guitar during the chorus and the spacey vocals Armstrong delivers.   On the lyrical end, one could not ask for more. The lyrics can be at times somewhat intense, and as such, seekers of more easy listening may wish to find music elsewhere. The only major problem on the lyrical end is Armstrong’s own slurring voice. He is, as usual, difficult to understand in his pronunciation and level of clarity. Listeners would be well advised to read the lyrics along with the music on the first listen, as many of the more clever, thoughtful and emotive lines can be completely lost in translation.  The album also loosely contains a story. The story in this album, though, is not nearly as thick as in some concept albums; at times the album seems more like a collection of songs with interrelated characters than a linear tale. This is, in its own way, somewhat refreshing — it certainly trumps being beaten over the head with the album’s “hidden meaning,” a tactic favored by bands like Styx. The songs stand on their own as well, so going out of order does not carry too great a penalty. It is certainly an experience in itself to piece together a story in an album, but it is not required.  Some find Green Day a tad preachy, though this album does not seem to come across that way. It seems more like a social commentary, which one can use how he or she wishes. Ultimately, the album does a spectacular job for its genre — it is not the “next big thing,” but it is certainly delightful to hear a band trying new things musically

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